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30.05.2022

Identity lottery at the DSMZ - everything is possible

The Leibniz Institute DSMZ is participating in the 10th German Diversity Day

Proportion of scientist and non-scientists at the DSMZ

Countries of origin of the DSMZ employees

The Leibniz Institute DSMZ-German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures in Braunschweig, Lower Saxony, is participating in the 10th German Diversity Day with various activities. The Diversity Day will take place nationwide on 31 May 2022. The DSMZ is not only diverse in its staff - the bioresource collection is also the most diverse in the world. More than 80,000 bacteria, archaea, protists, yeasts, fungi, bacteriophages, plant viruses, genomic bacterial DNA as well as human and animal cell cultures make up the DSMZ collection. This makes the Leibniz Institute DSMZ one of the largest collections worldwide.

German Diversity Day at the DSMZ: Identity Lotto
The activities for German Diversity Day are also diverse: in addition to mailings to the staff, press work, articles, posts on the DSMZ's social media channels on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, XING and Instagram, there is also the Identity Lotto. In the Identity Lotto, participants at the DSMZ can experience a communicative interaction on the topics of identity, gender and diversity. In this process, DSMZ employees slip into different roles and use the communication game to learn what life is like with a different identity (for example, origin, gender or sexual orientation). The board game is designed for two to six players and shows the different themes of life.

DSMZ: Diversity of life and diversity of the smallest organisms
Living diversity is everyday life for the microbiologists and cell researchers at the Leibniz Institute DSMZ. By actively participating in the nationwide Day of Action and, of course, throughout the year, the Leibniz Institute DSMZ-German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures is showing the "flag for diversity" in the working world. The Leibniz Institute signed the Diversity Charter in 2013 and has already participated in the German Diversity Day several times.

 

Press contact:
PhDr. Sven-David Müller, Head of Public Relations, Leibniz Institute DSMZ-German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH
Phone: ++49 (0)531/2616-300
Mail: press(at)dsmz.de

About the Leibniz Institute DSMZ
The Leibniz Institute DSMZ-German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures is the world's most diverse collection of biological resources (bacteria, archaea, protists, yeasts, fungi, bacteriophages, plant viruses, genomic bacterial DNA as well as human and animal cell lines). Microorganisms and cell cultures are collected, investigated and archived at the DSMZ. As an institution of the Leibniz Association, the DSMZ with its extensive scientific services and biological resources has been a global partner for research, science and industry since 1969. The DSMZ was the first registered collection in Europe (Regulation (EU) No. 511/2014) and is certified according to the quality standard ISO 9001:2015. As a patent depository, it offers the only possibility in Germany to deposit biological material in accordance with the requirements of the Budapest Treaty. In addition to scientific services, research is the second pillar of the DSMZ. The institute, located on the Science Campus Braunschweig-Süd, accommodates more than 80,000 cultures and biomaterials and has around 200 employees. www.dsmz.de

The Leibniz Association
The Leibniz Association connects 97 independent research institutions that range in focus from the natural, engineering and environmental sciences via economics, spatial and social sciences to the humanities. Leibniz Institutes address issues of social, economic and ecological relevance. They conduct knowledge-driven and applied basic research, maintain scientific infrastructure and provide research-based services. The Leibniz Association identifies focus areas for knowledge transfer to policy-makers, academia, business and the public. Leibniz institutions collaborate intensively with universities – including in the form of “Leibniz ScienceCampi” – as well as with industry and other partners at home and abroad. They are subject to a transparent, independent evaluation. Because of their importance for the country as a whole, the Leibniz Association Institutes are funded jointly by Germany’s central and regional governments. The Leibniz Institutes employ around 20,500 people, including 11,500 researchers. The financial volume amounts to 2 billion euros. www.leibniz-gemeinschaft.de